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One of the largest historic residences in Europe

Mannheim Baroque Palace

Stucco ornamentation in the Library Cabinet of Mannheim Palace. Image: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Andrea Rachele
An important treasure

The Library Cabinet

The Library Cabinet of Electress Elisabeth Auguste von der Pfalz survived the destruction of World War II with minimal damage. Here, richly decorated walls with bookshelves hidden behind lattice doors can be seen.

Library Cabinet in Mannheim Palace. Image: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, credit unknown

The cabinet is preserved in its original form even today.

A highlight of Rococo

The small cabinet lies on the ground floor of the main building and was part of the electress' intimate garden apartment. This tiny cabinet is the only one of the palace's more than 500 rooms that has survived in almost original condition. The architect from Lorraine, Nicolas de Pigage (1723–1796), not only supervised the construction of the royal library's interior, but also was responsible for this enchanting private cabinet, created between 1755 and 1757. Despite its over-elaborate decoration, the room feels very harmonious and balanced.

Stucco ornamentation in the Library Cabinet of Mannheim Palace. Image: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Andrea Rachele

Shells typical of the Rococo period.

Attractive interior design

Carved and colored wooden panels cover the walls. The bookshelves were hidden behind barred doors. Royal sculptors Augustin Egell and Johann Matthäus van den Branden created the woodcarvings. The workshop of Giuseppe Antonio Albuccio was responsible for the attractive ceiling stucco. Cabinetmaker Frank Zeller created a lovely parquet floor.

A retreat for the electress

Muses and allegorical images give the room a bright, sensuous atmosphere. The airy paintings in rose and light green were done by Philipp Hieronymus Brinkmann, director of the painting cabinet. Sadly, they were lost in storage during World War II, but can now be seen in the form of reconstructions. For Electress Elisabeth Auguste, this charming room had a special meaning: here, she had her own library where she could retreat with close friends and confidants.

Ceiling paintings in the Library Cabinet of Mannheim Palace. Image: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, credit unknown
Portrait cartouche in the Library Cabinet of Mannheim Palace. Image: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Andrea Rachele

An atmospheric room with loving details: here, the paintings on the ceiling and the walls.

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